Boat owners on parts of the Norfolk Broads will no longer have their bins collected, after a ruling by the local borough council

Great Yarmouth Borough Council has announced that it will no longer be collecting bins from 10 sites near moorings on the Norfolk Broads.

The decision will leave motorboat owners in the area with an increased problem of how to dispose of their rubbish.

In response to the decision, which reclassifies boat refuse from private to commercial waste, the Broads Authority’s Navigation Committee has pointed out that only 14% of boats registered on the Broads are hire craft.

David Broad, the committee’s chairman, said: “This is a very serious development and very disappointing in terms of both the decision and the way it has come about.”

With bin collection services due to come to an end on 16 June, the waterways authority has argued that boat owners have not been given enough time to make alternative arrangements.

What’s more, the Broads Authority claims that this cost-cutting measure will increase the risk of fly-tipping and lead to a general reluctance among landowners to accommodate moorings, which in turn would impact upon local tourism.

“The Broads has national park status and tourism is vital for the local economy but having rubbish lying around will impact on the environment and deter visitors,” Mr Broad continued.

His words were backed up by secretary of state Phil Durrant, who described the council’s actions as “irresponsible”, due to a lack of consultation.

The areas affected include parts of West Somerton, Acle, Staithe Road in Repps, and land belonging to Glebe Farm on the Stokesby river bank.