The E40 marks entry into a whole new world for Bavaria, a world of displacement hulls and single-digit speeds. The arrival of the E40 is timely with customers looking to save money not only on starting price (which limiting engine size to a single 300hp allows the yard to do) but on running costs, too.

I meet the Sedan version (there’s a flybridge, too) of the E40 on Loch Lomond, home to Bavaria’s Scottish agent Marine Sales and as perfect a venue as one could think up to trial a displacement motor cruiser with a 10-knot top speed. It’s as if the E was designed with Loch Lomond in mind, on a day when we experienced pretty much all four seasons the Sedan’s mix of spacious and sheltered raised aft cockpit and a bright saloon that treats occupants to excellent views out was just the job.

The saloon layout is unique, with the helm located just inside the cockpit doors and the living space spreading out forward. It worked an absolute treat in the calm surroundings of the Loch as we all relaxed indoors with passengers sitting forward of the helmsman, who has space next to them for another two guests to sit forward and enjoy the journey.

The sheer amount of glass means that there is no problem with the view out, even if you do sit a long way back at the helm. I would love to give it a go in rough offshore conditions to see how well the driving position works when it’s a bit lumpier but there’s little to complain about in calm weather.

If you are going to use the boat offshore then the largest single 300hp Volvo Penta D4 would probably be a sensible choice. Given the potential tidal effect and choppy conditions the extra grunt and 13-knot top speed with this engine will come in very useful.

The yard is also considering the option of a gyroscopic stabiliser, which is a very sensible idea given the hull shape and low cruising speeds.